Alterna Cremation’s Winnipeg Scattering Service

By: Alterna Cremation
Sunday, March 10, 2019

For most folks, the act of scattering a family member’s ashes brings closure and peace. It may symbolize the return of the person to nature, or release of their spirit into heaven. Be certain that you know the regulations and laws in your locality. While there isn’t any specific national “scattering ashes regulation” in the US, there are a variety of regulations and rules that you might have to be aware of at the local, state, and national levels. Alterna Cremation’s Winnipeg scattering service will explain those below:

The Majority of National Parks Permit Ashes to Be Scattered

It’s legal to scatter ashes inside Grand Canyon National Park if you first get permission.

Ask Permission Before You Scatter Ashes on Private Property

You’re free to scatter ashes any place on your own property; however, if another person owns the land, you must first ask permission. Either verbal or written permission is okay, yet it might be an excellent idea to have a record of the contract. If the owner of the property says no, find a different location. Do not attempt to just secretly spread the ashes anyway. As there might be no specific cremation ashes regulations that directly address this issue inside your state, it is trespassing, and it is illegal. You might face fines and also jail time.

Amusement Parks and Sports Stadiums Are Private Property

There often is a ton of confusion regarding the difference between private and public property. For example, the local NFL stadium is private property, although it might have been paid for, partially, by your tax dollars. There are several areas, which include additional sports stadiums, amusement parks, golf courses, and some museums, which have a multitude of visitors every year; however, that doesn’t make them public property.

Spreading Ashes in the Sea Is Permitted

It’s legal to spread ashes at sea, yet anything placed into the water has to easily decompose. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, burial at sea of human being remains – cremated or not – is allowed; however, there are many scattering ashes regulations and laws you should follow:

Any kind of remains, which includes ashes, only can be placed inside the ocean three or more nautical miles from land.

Ashes may be scattered from an airplane or boat.

Only urns that are biodegradable might be used. Anything that is placed inside the water easily must decompose inside a marine environment.

It’s possible to release wreaths or flowers into the water, yet they have to easily decompose.

While a permit isn’t needed, you have to report the burial to the Environmental Protection Agency within thirty days.

Pet cremains might not be spread at sea without a permit.

You Might Be Permitted to Scatter Ashes upon Uninhabited Public Land

It’s another one of those spreading ashes regulations which depend upon the state where you reside; therefore, always first check with the suitable authorities. Forests and additional wilderness areas may be a great place to scatter ashes yet do so away from typically used trails or other places in which you know people frequently travel or visit.

Leave a comment
Name*:
Email:
Comment*:
Please enter the numbers and letters you see in the image. Note that the case of the letters entered matters.

Comments

Please wait

Previous Posts

Cremation Versus Burial – How To Decide Which

Pre-planning your funeral or attempting to plan the services for a loved one who has passed can feel overwhelming. There are a tremendous number of decisions that must be made, but perhaps the most...

Baby-Friendly Business: Starting a Family in Today’s Working World

WINNIPEG, Canada – In this day and age, many women in business feel like they’re racing the clock to start a family, while simultaneously trying to build their careers. But maternity leave can imp...

Average Funeral Costs For 2021

When someone you love passes away, you realize how much paperwork it takes to arrange end-of-life services. Not only do you have a lot of decisions to make, but you don’t have a lot of time to do s...

The History Of Urns

We live, and then we die; it’s a tradition as old as time itself. And over the years, the ways different cultures and religions have dealt with death has changed. From burial services to cremations...

How Can You Benefit From Cremation Pre-Planning?

There’s no getting around it: it’s tough to talk about the end of your life. Many Canadians avoid pre-planning their funerals because it can be uncomfortable to discuss your arrangements with frien...

What To Do When Someone Has Passed Away

Many people are surprised by how much work falls to them after a family member passes. Despite reeling from the loss of someone dear to you, you have a list of duties to complete now that a loved o...

When Is The Appropriate Age To Pre-Plan Final Arrangements?

Do you remember when you were young, and you realized that one day, you were going to pass away? It might have occurred to you after losing a grandparent or watching something on TV. Either way, th...

Sympathy Flowers Etiquette: How To Send Condolences

Sometimes, words aren’t enough. Instead, we can express our compassion through another means: sympathy flowers. This gift conveys your condolences in a way that words cannot. Flowers represent sev...

How To Scatter Ashes

After losing a loved one, it can be hard to accept that someone so close to us is now gone. Scattering ashes allows us to visualize their departure and take comfort in knowing that their remains wi...

How To Write A Letter Of Condolence & Sympathy

When someone you care about loses a friend or family member, it’s a heartbreaking experience. Due to COVID-19, many people are losing loved ones who are older or have health conditions. It’s hard t...