Types Of Grief & Loss

By: Alterna Cremation
Friday, June 19, 2020

You might be familiar with the five stages of grief. But did you know that there are also different types of grief and loss? Not everyone deals with bereavement in the same way. These troubling emotions can arise after the loss of a loved one or at the end of a relationship. Just as individual people are different, so are their responses to traumatic events. The Canadian Mental Health Association claims that there is no one way to experience grief. Here are some of the different types of grief that people go through:

 

Anticipatory grief. Before a traumatic event happens, a person may already begin grieving. This occurs when a death is expected, like when a loved one has a terminal illness. It can be confusing to grieve before a death has occurred - show kindness to yourself and remember that this is normal. Anticipatory grief might help someone prepare for a death. 

 

Delayed grief. There may be a delay between the time someone learns of a death, and the time they experience grief. Don’t worry - this is also normal. Months may pass before a person begins the grieving process. This is more common among those who learn of a death during a stressful period of their lives. To cope with their stress, they may delay feelings of grief for several weeks, or even years.

 

Normal grief. Some find that it is possible to continue their daily routines even in the event of a death. The experience of grief can express itself as numbness. It doesn’t mean that you don’t care - it’s just how your body responds to bereavement.

 

Complicated grief. This type of grief disrupts daily life. It is characterized by a constant feeling of loss and can result in serious harm to the griever if they do not have a support system. Since this type of grief interferes with regular functioning, it’s important to lean on those around you for support.

 

Inhibited grief. One way that people grieve is by distracting themselves from their loss. It may appear as though this person is unaffected by their loss, but in reality, they are just avoiding it. Inhibited grief is a coping mechanism that may lead to negative consequences, such as fatigue and/or indigestion.

 

Disenfranchised grief. If someone feels that their loss is not significant due to societal norms or other circumstances, they may experience disenfranchised grief. Examples of these losses include the death of a pet or co-worker. It can be helpful to acknowledge that this is a normal feeling. Remember that your grief is valid, no matter what caused it. 

 

Absent grief. Some people grieve by showing no signs of it at all. They may deny that the event happened or avoid talking about it, which may result from shock or denial. This happens when a death occurs suddenly and unexpectedly. Even though a person appears normal on the outside, they may be grieving internally and choosing not to show it.

 

Everyone experiences grief at some point in their lives, but not all of us handle it the same way. You should not feel ashamed because of your grief; it’s a natural reaction to a traumatic event. Losing a loved one is a difficult experience. If you have lost a family member, Alterna Cremation offers Winnipeg crematorium services. Let us help you during this difficult time - we are here for you. 

 

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